useful design's picture
+0

I tried feeding a line mesh outlining a square into a Make 3D Object node but it didn't fill the outline. Also the corners were nasty, could do with some chamfering at least (a simple triangle calculation using line width).

I'm going to go ahead and make a FR seeing as Questions are rarely answered on this forum.

Comments

:-)

useful design's picture
Submitted by

:-) I tried to answer as many questions as I could on Kineme when I was learning QC. I don't know enough to answer questions yet. Feels like the biggest thing holding Vuo back currently is the small user base. More users more sharing and caring. Getting support learning Vuo is going to be critical for anybody so as Vuo grows attending to forums questions will be important. Kineme staff regularly contributed to Kineme especially on their plugins.

It's probably harder to learn

Kewl's picture
Submitted by

It's probably harder to learn Vuo coming from Quartz Composer: the person expect something to work in a certain way, and it doesn't. I tried QC maybe six or seven years ago and wasn't able to wrap my head around it. I began using Vuo a year ago and within a few hours, I had something minimal to show for. I try to promote Vuo any chance I get, but around me, it's either QC or TouchDesigner...

This is not an answer but it

pbourke's picture
Submitted by

This is not an answer but it does appear that a general filled polygon is an omission.

The line mesh and line strip mesh, although they don't meet your needs are behaving as one might expect. Each line segment is treated individually, not as a whole so the chamfering of finite width mesh segments isn't trivial. ... although could be done. One might also like the option for these lines to be finite thickness cylinders.

While non-trivial in CPU

useful design's picture
Submitted by

While non-trivial in CPU terms, mathematically using the line width value of the line mesh to calculate the geometry of endpoints at a join and using them to define two triangles that fill to the adjoining line mesh segment shouldn't be so hard. See image, just add △ABC and △CDE. Or for a radius joint (like Adobe Illustrator offers) draw circle centred at C with diameter W. For 3D points would obviously require a sphere not a circle to do corner radiusing, might make the rendering a bit slow even if it is flattened before it hits a shader how does it get flattened?

I made a composition in QC that used 8 spheres, 12 cylinders and 6 cubes to morph a sphere into a cube and back in various ways, so yeah, been there and it's not trivial to do by hand.

Alastair ... the triangle

pbourke's picture
Submitted by

Alastair ... the triangle patching between the meshes where two line join is a little trickier than just filling the missing bit. For lines at sharp angles you may need to trim protruding corners on the large angle side, and actually one wants to trim to avoid coplanar meshes on the small angle side. And yes, the standard way in 3D is to use cylinders and spheres, but a bit expensive. I would prefer to see a true line primitive.

you may need to trim

useful design's picture
Submitted by

you may need to trim protruding corners on the large angle side

Yes didn't want to complicate my answer with that detail!… Illustrator gives the choice of three corner options and has a parameter input of "limit" for the chamfering one which decides when it will extend out and when it will chamfer.

Above shows three strokes of differing widths, colour and corner settings applied to four closed paths. (Note not using identical corners settings for shape, it's illustrative not a direct comparison with identical settings, note shape 2 is a compound path and shape 3 has corners getting all three treatments with the green stroke set to corner limit of "4x")

Stokes palette in AI.

actually one wants to trim to avoid coplanar meshes on the small angle side

And yes, coincident coplanar mesh bits would need a "boolean add" operation under the hood or transparency would not work without generating ugly artifacts all over the corners. Maybe even at 100% opacity artifacts/nasty edges would appear. But surely there are OSS libraries that do this kind of thing? Mac Toolbox circa 1990 should be able to do it!

1 Answer

jstrecker's picture
+0

To a limited extent, yes — If the polygon can be created (or flattened from) one of Vuo's 3D shape nodes. You can see the nodes I mean by searching the node library for "make 3d shape".

For the example you gave of a filled square, you could use Make 3D Square together with Make Unlit Color Shader. Or for a gradient, use Make Unlit Image Shader and Make Linear/Radial Gradient Image.

These would just be simple shapes without other items you mentioned in your feature request, such as a stroke outline. (For others' reference, the feature request is here: Make a Polygon Mesh with Fill node.)